Phone: 305-874-2788
  TWU LOCAL 568
OFFICIAL INFORMATION ON COVID-19

What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The coronavirus typically affects the respiratory tract of humans. It is commonly associated with the common cold and more seriously, pneumonia. The disease was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and has since spread globally, resulting in the ongoing 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic. Common symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Other symptoms may include fatigue, muscle pain, diarrhea, sore throat, loss of smell and abdominal pain.

President Luis Rodriguez on COVID-19

TWU LOCAL 568 

Essential worker documentation

If you need documented proof that you are an essential worker, please click the button below to download a letter you may use. Simply type in your name and print it. If you need any help with the letter, please reach out to the Employee Service Center. 

Download a blank letter that you can print and then write your name in.

How to Protect Yourself & Others

First, Let's Know How it Spreads:

Illustration: woman sneezing on man

Person-to-person spread

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.
  • Maintaining good social distance (about 6 feet) is very important in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus. CDC recommends people practice frequent “hand hygiene,” which is either washing hands with soap or water or using an alcohol-based hand rub. CDC also recommends routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces.

How easily the virus spreads

How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious, like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily. Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, which means it goes from person-to-person without stopping.

  • The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading very easily and sustainably between people.
  • Information from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic suggests that this virus is spreading more efficiently than influenza, but not as efficiently as measles, which is highly contagious.

Everyone Should...

Illustration: washing hands with soap and water

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Tips from the CDC on washing your hands: Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives

Illustration: Woman quarantined to her home

Avoid close contact - Social Distancing

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • Put distance between yourself and other people, practice social distancing at all times.
  • Remember that some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.
  • Keeping distance from others is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Person with cloth face covering

Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

Tips from the CDC: Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • If you are in a private setting and do not have on your cloth face covering, remember to always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

cleaning a counter

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

Testing for COVID-19

Who should be tested:

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Here is some information that might help in making decisions about seeking care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for this virus.
  • Testing results may be helpful to inform decision-making about who you come in contact with.

CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

Call your doctor or your County Health Department if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing. 

Tell them about your symptoms and your exposure. They will decide whether you need to be tested.

Consult your health care provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Essential Workers Testing

A COVID-19 drive-thru testing center is operational near Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens from 9 am to 5 pm. We have received confirmation from various members that essential workers and their immediate family can get tested by bringing:

  • Have your airport ID
  • Drivers License
  • Insurance Card
  • Piece of paper with your phone number

All documents should be placed on the dashboard of your vehicle. The process is taking an average of 20 minutes and results are available 7 to 10 days after. You will only receive a call if you are positive to COVID-19, negative results will not be contacted. 

Hard Rock Stadium Address: 347 Don Shula Dr, Miami Gardens, FL 33056

What to Do if You Are Sick

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below:  If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have COVID-19, follow the steps below to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

man in bed

Stay home except to get medical care

  • Stay home: Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs, or if you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

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image depicting lungs with restricted air representing shortness of breath

When to Seek Medical Attention?

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

family separated

Separate yourself from other people and pets in your home, this is known as home isolation.

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you stay away from others. You should stay in a specific “sick room” if possible, and away from other people and pets in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.

on the phone with doctor

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

  • Call ahead: Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctor’s office, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.

man wearing a mask

If you are sick wear a cloth covering over your nose and mouth

You should wear a cloth face covering, over your nose and mouth if you must be around other people even at home).

Note: During the COVID-19 pandemic, medical-grade facemasks are reserved for healthcare workers and some first responders. You may need to improvise a cloth face-covering using a scarf or bandana.

Click for PDF: How to create a cloth face covering, according to the CDC

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover your coughs and sneezes

  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

washing hands

Clean your hands often

  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best options, especially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

don't share

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share: Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.

cleaning a counter

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day

Clean high-touch surfaces in your isolation area (“sick room” and bathroom) every day; let a caregiver clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in other areas of the home.

  • Clean and disinfect: Routinely clean high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom.
    • If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick person’s bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom.

High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

taking temperature

Monitor your symptoms

  • Common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention.
  • If you are having trouble breathing, seek medical attention, but call first.
    • Call your doctor or emergency room before going in and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do.
  • Wear a cloth face covering (covers your nose and mouth): Put on the cloth face covering when you leave your house or when around other people. You don’t need to wear the cloth face covering if you are alone. If you can’t put on a cloth face covering (because of trouble breathing for example), cover your coughs and sneezes in some other way. Try to stay at least 6 feet away from other people. This will help protect the people around you.
  • Follow care instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department: Your local health authorities may give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

How The Coronavirus Attacks the Body

 (video credit: The New York Times)

father playing with his son

How to discontinue home isolation

People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:

  • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use of medicine that reduces fevers)
      AND
    • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
      AND
    • at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
  • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
    • You no longer have a fever (without the use of medicine that reduces fevers)
      AND
    • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
      AND
    • you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

In all cases, follow the guidance of your healthcare provider and local health department. The decision to stop home isolation should be made in consultation with your healthcare provider and state and local health departments. Local decisions depend on local circumstances.

More information is available here.

Florida's COVID-19 Data and Surveillance Dashboard

Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection

VIDEO SUMMARY OF COVID-19

(Source: Wikipedia)

WHO is continuously monitoring and responding to this outbreak. This Q&A will be updated as more is known about COVID-19, how it spreads and how it is affecting people worldwide
(CLICK LINK)

Click on the Link for many resources that are available to help national, state and local governments as well as corporations, communities and health care professionals develop preparedness plans and strengthen the response to different scenarios for COVID-19.

(CLICK LINK)

(CLICK LINK)
We, at TWU Local 568 recently asked our law firm, Phillips Richard & Rind PA which offers legal services in areas of union general counsel. Whether or not the employer can or cannot release names of employees with COVID-19 and will there be any legal implications if they do release names?

Here's the answer with some situations as examples

Suppose a manager learns and confirms that an employee has CO-VID-19, or has symptoms associated with the disease. The manager knows she must report it but is worried about violating ADA confidentiality. What should she do?  

The ADA and HIPAA, of course, require that an employer keep all medical information about employees confidential, even if that information is not about disability. Clearly, here, the information that an employee has symptoms of, or a diagnosis of, COVID-19, is medical information. But the fact that this is medical information does not prevent the manager from reporting to appropriate employer officials so that they can take actions consistent with guidance from the CDC and other public health authorities.

The question is really what information to report: is it the fact that an employee -- unnamed employed-- has symptoms of COVID-19, or a diagnosis, or is it the identity of that employee? 

The answer is that exactly who in the organization needs to know the identity of the employee will really depend on each workplace and why a specific official needs this information. Employers should make every effort to limit the number of people who get to know the name of the employee.

Certainly, a designated representative of the employer may interview the employee to get a list of people with whom the employee possibly had contact through the workplace, so that the employer can then take action to notify those who may have come into contact with the employee.  However, this does not require disclosing the employee's name. For small employers, of course, co-workers might be able to figure out who the employee is, but employers are still in that situation prohibited from confirming or revealing the employee's identity.

Also, remember that all employer officials who are designated as needing to know the identity of an employee should be specifically instructed that they must maintain the confidentiality of this information. And in fact, employers may want to plan what supervisors and managers should do if this situation arises and determine in advance who will be responsible for receiving information and taking the next steps.

Employers may be concerned that telling employees that "someone at this location" or "someone on the fourth floor" has COVID-19 may not provide sufficient information to allow people to know if they should take further steps to protect themselves or others.  

Therefore, can employers tell the workforce the name of the employee with COVID-19? 

No, the ADA and HIPAA do not permit such a broad disclosure of the medical condition of a specific employee.  More importantly, this broad disclosure is not recommended by the CDC. The CDC specifically advises employers to maintain the confidentiality of people with confirmed COVID-19.

IMPORTANT LINKS 

***Sources: Center for Diseases Contro (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), Florida Department of Health, Wikipedia, The New York Times, New Jetnet, Phillips Richard & Rind PA Law Firm.****

TWU Local 568 is in no way shape or form a health organization, you should always double-check every procedure listed here and follow it at your own risk.

All information here was merely copied and pasted from official and government sources





Page Last Updated: Apr 06, 2020 (20:33:57)
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Contact Info
TWU Local 568
5395 NW 36th St
Miami Springs, FL 33166
  305-874-2788

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